X-ray of proximal fractures of the fifth metatarsal

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Author: Mikael Häggström [notes 1]

Classification

Proximal fractures of 5th metatarsal.jpg

In radiology, proximal fractures of the fifth toe are most appropriately classified by their location:

  • A proximal diaphysis fracture is typically a stress fracture, commonly among athletes.[1][2]
  • A metaphysis fracture or "Jones fracture"; Due to poor blood supply in this area, such a fracture sometimes does not heal and surgery is required.[3]
  • A tuberosity fracture or "pseudo-Jones fracture"/"dancer's fracture".[4] It is typically an avulsion fracture.[5]

Normal anatomy that may simulate a fracture include mainly:

  • The "apophysis", which is the secondary ossification center of the bone, and is normally present at 10 - 16 years of age.[6]
  • Os vesalianum, an accessory bone which is present in between 0.1 - 1% of the population.[7]

Report

  • Location
  • Even absence of displacement

Example:

Proximal fifth metatarsal fracture at borderline between metaphysis and tuberosity.jpg

Proximal fifth metatarsal fracture at borderline between metaphysis (Jones fracture) and tuberosity (pseudo-Jones fracture). 1 mm displaced.

See also: General notes on reporting

See also

Notes

  1. For a full list of contributors, see article history. Creators of images are attributed at the image description pages, seen by clicking on the images. See Radlines:Authorship for details.

References

  1. Bica D, Sprouse RA, Armen J (2016). "Diagnosis and Management of Common Foot Fractures. ". Am Fam Physician 93 (3): 183-91. PMID 26926612. Archived from the original. . 
  2. . 5th Metatarsal. Emergency Care Institute, New South Wales (2017-09-19).
  3. . Toe and Forefoot Fractures. OrthoInfo - AAOS (June 2016). Archived from the original on 16 October 2017. Retrieved on 15 October 2017.
  4. Robert Silbergleit. Foot Fracture. Medscape.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  5. Robert Silbergleit. Foot Fracture. Medscape.com. Retrieved on October 19, 2011.
  6. Deniz, G.; Kose, O.; Guneri, B.; Duygun, F. (2014). "Traction apophysitis of the fifth metatarsal base in a child: Iselin's disease ". Case Reports 2014 (may14 4): bcr2014204687–bcr2014204687. doi:10.1136/bcr-2014-204687. ISSN 1757-790X. 
  7. Nwawka, O. Kenechi; Hayashi, Daichi; Diaz, Luis E.; Goud, Ajay R.; Arndt, William F.; Roemer, Frank W.; Malguria, Nagina; Guermazi, Ali (2013). "Sesamoids and accessory ossicles of the foot: anatomical variability and related pathology ". Insights into Imaging 4 (5): 581–593. doi:10.1007/s13244-013-0277-1. ISSN 1869-4101.